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Links collected by Andy Bell from Mint Digital

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Jan
16th
Thu
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Eliot’s characters argue about whether overweight people can blame their girth on their parents, go all nimby about local development plans, and raise the alarm about (I paraphrase, but barely) death panels. In one passage, Dorothea, who has newly become an aunt, flees her sister’s house because “looking rapturously at Celia’s baby would not do for many hours in the day, and to remain in that momentous babe’s presence with persistent disregard was a course that could not have been tolerated”—no more in Middlemarch than in Park Slope.
Sep
26th
Thu
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For example, a June 1918 article from the trade publication Earnshaw’s Infants’ Department said, “The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls. The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl.” Other sources said blue was flattering for blonds, pink for brunettes; or blue was for blue-eyed babies, pink for brown-eyed babies, according to Paoletti.
May
10th
Fri
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The 30 most beautiful nature photography

stickygram:

Some of the most astonishing nature photos …

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Source: (ArchitectureArtDesigns)

(Source: sticky9blog)

Mar
13th
Wed
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To put it another way, governments set up a system that in effect treated bankers as naughty children or ravenous puppies who could not be trusted not to eat too much of the dangerously fattening stuff - and regulators were to be the health conscious parents.

The perhaps predictable result is that the bankers lived up to the low expectations of their common sense, and devised ever more clever ways to raid the biscuit tin without being seen. And the regulators turned out to be the worst kind of parents: ignorant of what was really happening in the world; prescriptive in all the wrong ways.

Under the Basel system, regulators ordained - for example - that banks could lend more relative to their capital if they were providing mortgages to house buyers than they could if they were lending to a giant multinational company: regulators deemed it was less risky for a bank to provide you with a mortgage than to lend to Tesco.

Or to put it in the appropriate jargon, the risk weighting for mortgages was - and is - much lower than for corporate loans.

Feb
10th
Sun
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In German law, the owner of a family business who passes it on to the next generation can avoid paying inheritance tax if, during their tenure, they have increased employment and thereby benefited the economy.
Jan
7th
Mon
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Dec
20th
Thu
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kickstarter:

Foldable us. 
When Keiji Zhu wanted a good gift for a friend, he didn’t go to the store. He set out on a mission: to create cute, 3D replicas of his buddies from a single sheet of paper.
Foldable.me came to life via a Kickstarter project last April, and the interactive website is now spreading miniature humans through the mail. Here’s what most of Kickstarter HQ looks like in 2-inch-tall form. 

kickstarter:

Foldable us. 

When Keiji Zhu wanted a good gift for a friend, he didn’t go to the store. He set out on a mission: to create cute, 3D replicas of his buddies from a single sheet of paper.

Foldable.me came to life via a Kickstarter project last April, and the interactive website is now spreading miniature humans through the mail. Here’s what most of Kickstarter HQ looks like in 2-inch-tall form. 

Dec
18th
Tue
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The poverty trap in graph form

The poverty trap in graph form

Oct
14th
Sun
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Usually successful startups happen because the founders are sufficiently different from other people that ideas few others can see seem obvious to them. Perhaps later they step back and notice they’ve found an idea in everyone else’s blind spot, and from that point make a deliberate effort to stay there. [3] But at the moment when successful startups get started, much of the innovation is unconscious.
Sep
16th
Sun
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Blake was not a politician, but there is more understanding of the nature of capitalist society in a poem like ‘I wander through each charted street’ than in three-quarters of Socialist literature. Progress is not an illusion, it happens, but it is slow and invariably disappointing. There is always a new tyrant waiting to take over from the old–generally not quite so bad, but still a tyrant. Consequently two viewpoints are always tenable. The one, how can you improve human nature until you have changed the system? The other, what is the use of changing the system before you have improved human nature? They appeal to different individuals, and they probably show a tendency to alternate in point of time.